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Department of Archaeology

 
Read more at: Canterbury suburbs home to some of Britain’s earliest humans, 600,000-year-old finds reveal

Canterbury suburbs home to some of Britain’s earliest humans, 600,000-year-old finds reveal

22 June 2022

Archaeological discoveries made on the outskirts of Canterbury, Kent (England) confirm the presence of early humans in southern Britain between 560,000 and 620,000 years ago.


Read more at: Bed burials in early medieval Europe

Bed burials in early medieval Europe

17 June 2022

Study suggests bed burial ritual was imported into England by women as part of the Christianisation process.


Read more at: Senior promotions in the Department of Archaeology

Senior promotions in the Department of Archaeology

16 June 2022

Congratulations to Cameron Petrie and Emma Pomeroy on their recently announced promotions.


Read more at: Study of ​'Stone Swiss Army Knives of Prehistory' Shows Social Connectedness Key to Success in Early Humans

Study of ​'Stone Swiss Army Knives of Prehistory' Shows Social Connectedness Key to Success in Early Humans

9 June 2022

Howiesons Poort backed artifacts provide evidence for social connectivity across southern Africa during the Final Pleistocene.


Read more at: First Australians ate giant eggs of huge flightless birds, ancient proteins confirm

First Australians ate giant eggs of huge flightless birds, ancient proteins confirm

26 May 2022

Scientists settle debate surrounding 'Thunder bird' species, and whether its eggs were exploited by early Australian people around 50,000 years ago.


Read more at: Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge
Capillariid worm egg from Durrington Walls, Stonehenge.

Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge

20 May 2022

Study of ancient faeces found at a settlement thought to have housed builders of the famous stone monument suggests that parasites got consumed via badly-cooked cow offal during epic winter feasts.