skip to primary navigationskip to content

News

Site News
Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle – and vice versa

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle – and vice versa

New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle – and vice versa - Read More…

Re-Animating the Nameless Dead : A Face of Medieval Cambridge Revealed

As part of the Wellcome Trust-funded project, "After the plague: health and history in medieval Cambridge," archaeologists have revealed a face of medieval Cambridge.

Re-Animating the Nameless Dead : A Face of Medieval Cambridge Revealed - Read More…

ERC : Celebration of ten years of Anthropology, Archaeology and Classics Projects

The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research will host a European Research Council celebration event on Thursday, 16 March as part of ERC Week

ERC : Celebration of ten years of Anthropology, Archaeology and Classics Projects - Read More…

The Train that Floats in the Sky - Cambridgeshire's remarkable high-speed hovertrain experiment of the 1960s and '70s

As part of ongoing investigations into ‘fenland utopias’ by the Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU), the story of Cambridgeshire’s hovertrain is the subject of a new short film - The Train that Floats in the Sky.

The Train that Floats in the Sky - Cambridgeshire's remarkable high-speed hovertrain experiment of the 1960s and '70s - Read More…

Baltic hunter-gatherers adopted farming without influence of mass migration, ancient DNA suggests

Ancient DNA analyses show that – unlike elsewhere in Europe – farmers from the Near East did not overtake hunter-gatherer populations in the Baltic. The findings also suggest that the Balto-Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family originated in the Steppe grasslands of the East.

Baltic hunter-gatherers adopted farming without influence of mass migration, ancient DNA suggests - Read More…

Ethiopian site sheds new light on human behaviour in the Middle and Late Stone Age

Recent sedimentological and dating results from the sequence of Goda Buticha cave, southeastern Ethiopia, yield new data on human occupation of the region during the period 65,000 to 1,000 years ago.

Ethiopian site sheds new light on human behaviour in the Middle and Late Stone Age - Read More…

PUBLISHED: The archaeology of the Niah Caves, Sarawak. (Volume II)

Edited by Graeme Barker and Lucy Farr, this book is the companion volume to Rainforest Foraging and Farming in Island Southeast Asia: the Archaeology of the Niah Caves, Sarawak. Together, they describe the most significant results of the Niah Caves Project.

PUBLISHED: The archaeology of the Niah Caves, Sarawak. (Volume II) - Read More…

The Ancient Indus Civilization’s Adaptation to Climate Change

Published in Current Anthropology, a new article explores how an ancient culture dealt with variable environments.

The Ancient Indus Civilization’s Adaptation to Climate Change - Read More…

Revealing Cambridge's Augustinian Friary

Over the past three months a team from the Cambridge Archaeological Unit have been undertaking the largest excavation ever of a medieval religious house in Cambridge.

Revealing Cambridge's Augustinian Friary - Read More…

Nonino Prize 2017 awarded to Cyprian Broodbank

A further prestigious literary award for Cyprian Broodbank volume 'The Making of the Middle Sea'

Nonino Prize 2017 awarded to Cyprian Broodbank - Read More…

New MPhil bursaries for 2017-18 entry

Archaeology at Cambridge is pleased to announce the creation of a series of new bursaries for MPhil students for the academic year 2017-18 across its whole course range.

New MPhil bursaries for 2017-18 entry - Read More…

Public Invited to Archaeology Open Day in Cambridge City Centre

The Cambridge Archaeological Unit (CAU) are hosting an Archaeology Open Day on Saturday 17 December on the site of major excavations taking place as part of the University of Cambridge’s redevelopment of the New Museums site.

Public Invited to Archaeology Open Day in Cambridge City Centre - Read More…

WATCH ONLINE: 28th annual McDonald Lecture - Prof Eske Willerslev

Prof Eske Willerslev's presentation "Human Migration and Mega Faunal Extinctions" at the 28th annual McDonald lecture now available to watch online.

WATCH ONLINE: 28th annual McDonald Lecture - Prof Eske Willerslev - Read More…

Farming rice in India much older than thought, used as a ‘summer crop’ by the Indus Civilisation

Thought to have arrived from China in 2000 BC, latest research shows sustainable domesticated rice agriculture in India and Pakistan existed centuries earlier, and suggests systems of seasonal crop variation that would have provided a rich and diverse diet for the Bronze Age residents of the Indus valley.

Farming rice in India much older than thought, used as a ‘summer crop’ by the Indus Civilisation - Read More…

Cambridge Archaeology at the Festival of Ideas

Cambridge Archaeology are hosting a number of events throughout this year's Festival of Ideas. Find out more!

Cambridge Archaeology at the Festival of Ideas - Read More…

Roger Bland announced as a British Academy’s President’s Medal winner

Senior Fellow of the McDonald Institute, Bland receives recognition for his contribution to the protection, and academic and public understanding, of Britain’s cultural heritage

Roger Bland announced as a British Academy’s President’s Medal winner - Read More…

Genetic ‘trace’ in Papuan genomes suggests two expansions out of Africa

Several major studies, published today, concur that virtually all current global human populations stem from a single wave of expansion out of Africa. Yet one has found 2% of the genome in Papuan populations points to an earlier, separate dispersal event – and an extinct lineage that made it to the islands of Southeast Asia and Oceania.

Genetic ‘trace’ in Papuan genomes suggests two expansions out of Africa - Read More…

Dr. David Trump, FSA, UOM (1931-2016)

Well-known archaeologist David Trump, who led some of the finest explorations in Malta, has died at the age of 85.

Dr. David Trump, FSA, UOM (1931-2016) - Read More…

Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day Wednesday 2 November 2016

The University of Cambridge is proud to be hosting the first Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day on Wednesday 2 November 2016.

Cambridge Postgraduate Open Day Wednesday 2 November 2016 - Read More…

Ancient dental plaque sheds new light on the diet of Mesolithic foragers in the Balkans

Micro-fossils trapped in dental calculus reveal that Late Mesolithic foragers were consuming domesticated plant foods c. 6600 BC, almost 400 years earlier than previously thought.

Ancient dental plaque sheds new light on the diet of Mesolithic foragers in the Balkans - Read More…

Bone Analysis Breakthrough Reveals Britain's Last Hunter-Gatherers

Rare human bones from the UK dating to the Late Mesolithic era have been identified using an innovative new bone collagen analysis technique.

Bone Analysis Breakthrough Reveals Britain's Last Hunter-Gatherers - Read More…

AHRC Fellowship at Library of Congress for PhD student Alex Loktionov

Alex Loktionov, a PhD student in Egyptology, gains a fellowship at the Library of Congress as part of the AHRC International Placement Scheme

AHRC Fellowship at Library of Congress for PhD student Alex Loktionov - Read More…

New Piltdown Hoax analysis points to work of ‘lone forger’

A new analysis of the famous Piltdown Man forgeries points the finger of suspicion even more firmly at their discoverer, Charles Dawson.

New Piltdown Hoax analysis points to work of ‘lone forger’ - Read More…

Latest archaeological finds at Must Farm provide a vivid picture of everyday life in the Bronze Age

Excavation of a site in the Cambridgeshire fens reveals a Bronze Age settlement with connections far beyond its watery location. Must Farm has yielded Britain’s largest collections of Bronze Age textiles, beads and domestic artefacts. The finds provide a stunning snapshot of a community thriving 3,000 years ago.

Latest archaeological finds at Must Farm provide a vivid picture of everyday life in the Bronze Age - Read More…

Must Farm wins award for Best Archaeological Discovery at BAAs!

The team from Must Farm and the Cambridge Archaeological Unit have won the British Archaeological Award for 'Best Archaeological Discovery'

Must Farm wins award for Best Archaeological Discovery at BAAs! - Read More…

RSS Feed Latest news

Tiller the Hun? Farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle – and vice versa

Mar 22, 2017

New archaeological analysis suggests people of Western Roman Empire switched between Hunnic nomadism and settled farming over a lifetime. Findings may be evidence of tribal encroachment that undermined Roman Empire during 5th century AD, contributing to its fall.

Re-Animating the Nameless Dead : A Face of Medieval Cambridge Revealed

Mar 20, 2017

As part of the Wellcome Trust-funded project, "After the plague: health and history in medieval Cambridge," archaeologists have revealed a face of medieval Cambridge.

View all news